‘No Place to Hide’: Will Your Name Be on Greenwald’s List?

‘No Place to Hide’: Will Your Name Be on Greenwald’s List?

There is a list and your name could be on it. Will Glenn Greenwald’s list include the names of ‘political critics’? ‘Dissidents’? ‘Activists’? Or even genuine terrorists? We won’t know until he publishes it on The Intercept.

Greenwald’s list of names will be the big bang ending to the Snowden leaks. Or at least that’s what he’s promising.

But Greenwald has one critic that says he shouldn’t get to decide which government secrets should be published:

“The Snowden leaks were important — a legitimate scoop — and we might never have known about the N.S.A.’s lawbreaking if it hadn’t been for them,” writes Michael Kinsley during a review of Greenwald’s book, ‘No Place to Hide,’ for The New York Times. “Most leaks from large bureaucracies are “good” leaks: no danger to national security, no harm to innocent people, information the public ought to have.”

“The trouble is this: Greenwald says that Snowden told him to “use your journalistic judgment to only publish those documents that the public should see and that can be revealed without harm to any innocent people.” … Snowden may be willing to trust Greenwald to make this judgment correctly — but are you? And even if you do trust Greenwald’s judgment, which on the evidence might be unwise, how can we be sure the next leaker will be so scrupulous?”

Or put in other words: “If the leaker can go to prison, why should the leakee be exempt?

It’s an intriguing question…until Kinsley says the government should have the final say.

(Needless to say, his review of ‘No Place to Hide’ stirred up lots of discussion including an article from the New York Times public editor, Margaret Sullivan.)

It’s a question that edges precariously close to endangering the First Amendment and the freedom of the press.

As Kirsten Powers of USA TODAY writes:

Now we have Michael Kinsley doubling down on the chilling notion that certain types of investigative journalism should be criminalized. In his New York Times review of Greenwald’s new book, No Place to Hide, Kinsley argues, “There shouldn’t be a special class of people called ‘journalists’ with privileges like publishing secret government documents.”

Actually, there should be, and there is. Without that protection, The Times could not have published the Pentagon Papers. Take that protection away, and we have zero oversight of the government from outside forces.

Kinsley’s question is a terrible but important one. Without Snowden, we’d still be in the dark about what our government is doing. Without Snowden, Sen. Rand Paul wouldn’t have a class action lawsuit against the NSA. But, as Snowden detractors frequently say, Snowden also opened the gateway for revealing our national security secrets to the world.

While Rand praised Snowden, he also noted that “it’s [not] okay to leak secrets and give up national secrets and things that could endanger lives. Glenn Greenwald was a part of that loop and now he’s revealing another piece of the puzzle.

One thing is clear, however, we’re trading our liberty for security everyday. We, Americans, might enjoy watching spy games on T.V. but it’s quite another thing to be part of one.

Is Greenwald’s list going to be a big bang as promised? Will those on the list even appreciate the exposure of their names to the media? Share your thoughts below or leave a comment on our Facebook page. Send us a tweet if you want to be bold. We always appreciate a new voice!

 

(Photo courtesy of RestrictedData, via Flickr CC BY 2.0)

 

WATCH: Glenn Greenwald on Rand Paul’s NSA Lawsuit (1:28)Like tag

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